Friday, January 17, 2014

Montague Navigator Folding Bicycle, Burley Travoy Commuting Trailer, and Amtrak

Two carry-on bags and an underseat bag.
Last April, 2013, I was planning to take Amtrak with my Navigator and Travoy out to see my parents. I chronicled my hopes in an April 21 post. Then I had to suddenly leave by airplane and stay six months. Now I'm ready to try again. Writing this on a Friday, I will be on the train Sunday, January 19. (Article updated at the end, describing my--and the bike's--journey.)

It's in the 40's to 60's in California. Below is what it looks like in Iowa. I'm looking forward to some warm bike-riding weather, even though my 89-year-old mom is saying "it's cold out here" in California.

This is the bicycle weather I'm leaving for two weeks.
The Montague Navigator will be packed in its soft carrying bag. I'm hoping that the carrying and stowing will just be done by myself as I board and depart the train. I also will be taking the Amtrak shuttle bus from Sacramento to Oroville, California. I plan to add to this post after I arrive, detailing the ease of Amtrak service.

Although Montague boasts its under-a-minute breakdown of its folding bike line, I'm being more cautious because of the length and manner of the bike's transport. Here are some precautions I've taken while packing the bicycle:
  1. I've added folding pedals. Montague provides this option when purchasing. I bought folding pedals online from a different source at a later date. The folding pedals really slim the width and allow for easier bagging because the slimmer profile allows for more space when zipping.
  2. I removed the fender attachments which are added to the braking bolt assemblage. When the bike was folded the "prongs" for the fenders stuck out and could easily be bent, could scratch the bike, or could damage the bag--in my opinion, anyway. This will add maybe ten minutes bike assembly, but if it's not raining, I'll just add the fenders later. Hey, it's the California Central Valley.
    The folding pedals and the sprocket protection are shown.
  3. I've bought some plumbing pipe insulation tubing. Cutting a section, I slipped it around the sprocket to protect and lessen grease stains. I also bought an inexpensive backpack rain cover that I've slipped around the drive train.
    Drive-train cover, fenders, and extra bags.
  4. I'm adding some ditty bags with clothes and sundry to the bag, since my two carry-on bags for Amtrak will be the bike and the trailer. Both bike and trailer bags can hold extra. If I were really serious, I'd tuck more carefully, but I have cooking access and extra clothes at my parents' place, since I go there regularly to support them. If I were heading out to tour, I'd probably send a general delivery box to my departure town in advance of the train trip. I could include food and cooking materials in that box.
    I might add a small ditty bag to this.
The entire arrangement will consist of three "bags," the bike, the trailer, and my underseat knapsack, which fits with the Amtrak folding bike policy:
"Folding bicycles under the dimensions of 34" x 15" x 48"/860 x 380 x 1120 mm will be allowed onboard all trains in lieu of a piece of baggage. They must be considered a true folding bicycle."
 A recent flap regarding folding bicycles and Amtrak was posted by BikePortland. It involved a Texas route and car attendants who were under-informed and probably over-worked and tired. The article makes me nervous, so I'll see what happens in a couple of days. My feeling is that the folding bike policy states they are allowed on "all trains" and count as one of the two carry-on bags. My bike bag fits easily within the allowable size standards, the Zephyr certainly is one of "all trains," so I see no problem. I'm bringing along a hard copy of the online policy.

Wish me luck--and I'll add an addendum after I reach California.

UPDATE AFTER ARRIVAL

At the Sacramento Amtrak train/Amtrak bus terminal

The stationmaster and the Amtrak conductor at the Zephyr's arrival in Ottumwa never questioned the "oversize" bike bag, although I did at the appropriate moment state, "It's a folding bike." I did not have to use my printing of Amtrak folding bike policy or explain anything.

The conductor at boarding told me to put the bike in a separate storage room right next to the baggage area, a room whose sliding door was marked "Authorized Personnel Only." Opening the door revealed a large room that was empty except for a scoop shovel and a broom in one corner. I leaned the bike upright against the wall nearest the door.

This was great because placing the bike in the bike in the storage area would have meant placing it on its side. During the trip I could peek through the door's lower ventilation grate and see the bike safely upright in its bag. Later, the last Amtrak crew before arrival brought the bike out and placed it on the baggage rack near the coach car's door. Luckily, it was placed on the side that kept the derailleur up.

Arriving at Sacramento, the train arrives about a half mile from the station because Amtrak is in the process of moving and upgrading the facility. Little electric shuttle cars transport passengers and luggage to the terminal building. The driver of the electric shuttle asked me, "What's that?!" in a somewhat panicked voice when seeing the size of my bike bag, and asked me to help him load it. I was more than happy to help because it allowed me to keep the derailleur upright so it wouldn't be bent.

The Amtrak "Thruway" shuttle bus driver didn't blink at my mention of the folding bike. I helped load again, mentioning that I wanted the derailleur up when placing the bike on its side.

Arriving at the Oroville pick-up and drop-off site, I assembled my rig on the sidewalk before a gas station (having the station's canopy lights as an aid) and then rode my bike nine miles to my parents' place.

Ready to roll after two days of sitting
As a folding bike traveler, Amtrak was very easy for me. Amtrak personnel seemed knowledgeable in policies--at least, there was never any questioning of policy. The bike was not damaged in any way, and I felt just plain smug-happy self-sufficient to slap my bike together and pedal on down the road.

Rocky Mountains, sightseeing and heading toward warmer climes
For a fuller description of the Amtrak journey (with more photos) see my January 22 writing blog post at Tom Kepler Writing.
Copyright 2014 by Thomas L. Kepler, all rights reserved

Monday, October 28, 2013

An Enjoyable Ride to the Top of Table Mountain

North of Oroville, California, are the north and south Table Mountains--and on a Sunday morning, October 20, I finally rode to the top of the north mesa. The photo at the right is a view from Oroville of the south table with the north behind it.

Sunday morning was a good day to make this ride because the traffic was light. I rode almost the whole way but walked toward the top off and on while taking photos. Also, to be honest, I felt no compunction to bust a gut. The road is steeper as one approaches the top! I had not been on this road for many years. There is a bleak beauty to the place. I really enjoyed the climb, so I must be getting in shape. The ride from my parents' place was about 25 miles roundtrip. Table Mountain is a big part of Oroville, dominating the landscape above the town and being a winding trip all adolescents seem to drive at least once.

The beginning of the ride is like much of the outskirts or Oroville--some flats and a bit of climbing as the road eases into the foothills.



I chose this ride on Sunday morning, October 20, because I just felt like climbing. I'd grind down to my low gears, and when that wasn't good enough, I'd gear up about three and stand and mash the pedals.
The green sack is filled with all the clothes I took off between eight and nine o'clock. The sun heated the mountain up quickly, and maybe the climb warmed me, also! The fall is the perfect time to ride and climb because the temperature misses the extremes.
Because the road skirts the ravine and is not at the top of the mesa, the views are bound by trees as the ride ascends. Colors are faded by the morning sun, but the silence and the space were just what I needed.

That's California's Central Valley in the distance.
In the haze are the Sutter Buttes, the smallest mountain range in the world. One thing I like about riding into the foothills is how quickly one can get above the valley and gain a new view of the environment.
There are several "tables" to Table Mountain. Cherokee Road goes to the second table, wending its way between the two mesas. The road is twisty and quirky, often leaning the wrong way into a turn or sagging at the road's edge where the earth has slipped away. Sunday morning allowed me to enjoy the road with little traffic.
This is the top--looking pretty normal until turning around and seeing the vista from the mesa's edge. Because the mesa is big, except for the lava runs, much of the environment looks like the valley with scrub oak and bleached grasses. The road across the top is pretty flat, having some ups and downs as it winds through the lava flows.

This is me at the top. Further on, according to Google Maps, is a ecological research station. If I would have known that, I'd have pedaled a little more. It's a unique experience to pedal up the steep hills and then to reach the top and see a flat expanse. Where's the downhill? In this case, a ways across the mesa.

Here's standing on a bluff after ducking through a barbed wire fence.
It appears that the slopes ease off to the valley. It was not possible from where I was to capture the precipitous drop-off of the mesa that is so dramatic from the valley.

On the way down are a series of ravines and saddles as the lava spread and cooled.
Bypassing the first table is a climb and then a drop down between the two tables to a short series of meadows. These meadows were used for dirt and mud trucking and other motor mayhem, at least in my brother's time.

Cherokee Road continues on as Oregon Gulch Road heads off and on into the boondocks. These steep roads are OK because it rarely freezes or snows. On those rare occasions that it does, folks just stay home till the sun melts the freeze. I stopped off here on way down the mountain.

At the bottom of the gulch is a stream. The road continues on into the canyon "breaks" as washboard gravel. Even though close to town, one can quickly get into an area where few people travel. People live on these roads, but there certainly is little through traffic, although the road does loop around to Highway 70. This photo is a "where the sidewalk" or paved road ends moment.

I didn't want to mess with washboard gravel and the possibility of puncture vine thorns. However, up this road my mom attended a one-room school in the boondocks over 70 years ago. The school is gone now. This photo is at the bridge where the pavement ends. There was a pretty stream below. Maybe the trip to the school site is one I'll take in the spring before all the puncture vine thorns mature and harden, as they are now in the fall.
The reservoir above the powerhouse diversion dam creates a quiet boating experience. I saw folks kayaking there the first morning I rode this far. I ate a 2nd breakfast beside the water on my first trip in this direction a few weeks ago. I only got as far as the reservoir on that first trip and had to return because of limited time.
My gag shot. Here I am next to the bridge over the aqueduct that moves the water to Southern California. I wonder if someone called the sheriff: "We've got a 555 on the Cherokee Road aqueduct bridge . . . " As I was setting up and taking the shot, a couple in an SUV came whizzing by, shouting "Woo Hoo!!!" Let my freak flag fly.
Then it was down to the Feather River and across the pedestrian/cycling bridge. When I went to high school, this was the only bridge. Now just east of this bridge is one for cars.
This trip may be the cap of my biking here in Oroville this year. It looks like I'll be going home in a little over a week. I'm glad to be going home (I've been here for 6 months), but the riding here in Oroville is a great variety of valley riding and mountain climbing, whatever I want. I can always visit again, though--and I will.

Copyright 2013 by Thomas L. Kepler, all rights reserved

Thursday, October 3, 2013

Raleigh Detour 2.5 Bicycle Review

"Probably the best buy for a light touring bike," said my local bike shop guy in southeast Iowa, "is the Raleigh 2.5 Detour."

"A touring bike for $350?"

"Well, it's got a steel frame, no shocks, a granny gear, and 700C tires. Sure, you get more for the Detour 5.5, but it costs $300 more. If you're looking for solid yet inexpensive, then the 2.5 is a great buy. An extra $70 will get you a rear rack and fenders."

A sudden trip to California to take care of my elderly parents for six months led me after two months to remember this conversation and purchase the 2.5 Detour. I can say that I am satisfied with the results.

I have to be with my family every day, but once my brother (who had broken his leg) was able to cook breakfast for my parents, I began taking day rides in the morning, usually from around fifteen miles (we're six miles from town) to thirty miles.

The bike has handled very well--it climbs well, the components have held up, and I've found the bike comfortable. I've managed to put in about 300 miles a month, so I'm now probably close to a thousand miles on the bike.

If I had to change anything, I'd probably get a better seat. The stock seat squeaks a little and is somewhat wide--not restrictively bad, since I haven't been cycling over 3-4 hours, but a more upgrade seat would probably be my first choice.

The granny gear helps a great deal on the mountain roads here in northern California in the foothills of the Sierra Nevadas. I use a Bike Pro canvas folding bag that hooks onto the rear rack. This combo lets me shop and also carry around a few bike tools and spare tube.

Greenline Cycles, the local bike shop in Oroville, California, ordered the bike for me, and it arrived in a week. I received a free tune-up after three months. I'd feel pretty comfortable using this bike for touring, as long as I didn't weigh it down excessively. Using my Burley Travoy trailer, which would lessen the strain on the wheels, I think I could even do longer tours.

My point, though, is that this is a great bike for the money. For $350 plus another hundred for accessories, a chance to hit the road with a new bike is pretty wonderful.

Plus, it comes in blue.

Copyright 2013 by Thomas L. Kepler, all rights reserved

Saturday, September 28, 2013

"Distance" and Perspective

Table Mt. Blvd., Oroville, CA
I remember when riding my bike two miles to downtown Fairfield, Iowa, was a big deal.  After all, it included the steepest hill in town that required using my bike's lowest gears!

Now that I have been riding in Oroville, California, for several months while staying with my parents, the six-mile ride to town is just a normal thing. My gauge has adjusted, expanded.

Part of the "adjustment" is physical conditioning, but the other part is mental. For me, the physical conditioning was not a big change. What changed was with retirement more time to ride--even though I can't be gone for much more than three hours usually. The longer distances came naturally.

I've been reading journals of self-contained bicycle tours and came across the following statement: "Today was a short day, only 30 km." Thirty kilometers equals 18.6411 miles. This is now an unremarkable distance for me, too.

Pacific Heights Rd., Oroville, CA

The longest I have bicycled so far is 43 miles. This morning I rode for three hours before turning around because of time--28 miles--and I would have loved to have continued riding. I'm looking forward to when I have more time to ride longer distances when touring.

Many long-distance touring cyclists regularly travel 50-80 miles a day--no big deal.

There is a joy when the body is working well. There is a joy from moving under ones' own power. There is a connection with the environment while riding a bike.

That sense of unity is worth attaining, and it's worthy of celebration.

Copyright 2013 by Thomas L. Kepler, all rights reserved

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

Day Rides in Oroville, California . . . I'm Still Rolling

The best decision I've  made in a long time is that once I realized I'll be spending about six months caring for my parents and brother, I chose to buy a bicycle. I made that decision about two months into my California stay, and I thank my wife for endorsing and encouraging me to action on my desire.

I've now been taking day rides in the Oroville area. These rides are good for both mind and body. The physical activity involved with spending time with people who are blind or who use walkers or wheelchairs is limited. I'm glad I have the time and the opportunity to be active more according to my current needs and abilities. Thank you, everyone, for giving me the chance to engage in something that gives me joy.

Crazy Guy on a Bike is a website that provides the space for individuals who ride bicycles to post journals and photos about their bicycle travels. Neil Gunton is a bicyclist who is also a computer programmer. He toured on his bicycle one year . . . and developed a website to share his exploits. He has opened that site up to others, including me. CGOAB now includes thousands of journals with photos, product reviews, a bicycling forum, and much more. The site now has a life of its own (still shepherded by Neil), including the possibility of donation to support it. Thank you, Neil.

Here is my profile for CGOAB. It includes my journals/photos, my travels so far. Below are photos and comments about my travels during this time that I am away from SE Iowa while taking care of my family.

This photo represents for me much of the reason why I am bicycling. The shot is a creative experience--seeing the opportunity and taking the shot, and then working with the photo, cropping, turning it to a b & w photo, and playing with contrast. I think I've created a mood that represents (at least for me) what I was experiencing at that moment on Lone Tree Road west of the little town of Palermo: the power and grandeur of nature, the wonderful mystery of life, and the underlying, silent, pure potentiality that is the basis of all activity and individual intelligence.

Taken about 8:30 AM, this photo isn't technically great, but the sky and the morning were. This was the first time I had ever been on this road. Although I can deal with traffic, its lack that morning provided deep satisfaction. In no hurry, I stopped, took photographs, enjoyed the morning, and appreciated being there. The only sounds were those of nature and the whisper of my tires on the pavement. The sky was huge and bright and beckoning. The road before me was an invitation. I gratefully accepted the moment given me, pedaling toward the horizon, alone yet completely connected.

Here I am on a gravel road, a 2.5-mile connection to the next paved section. I enjoyed the change the gravel gave me, and I enjoyed the new environment. I met one auto on this road, a farmer in a pick-up. I like how on these rides I have an overall time frame of travel, since I am caring for my family, yet within that time I am free to rest, explore, or just ride. I usually take some food and stop somewhere along the way for a snack and an opportunity to let the world come to me rather than my coming to it. "Earth abides" is the phrase that sums up this photo for me: I am engaged in the everyday task on eating, yet around me, those eternal rhythms of nature paint the environment with large strokes. The distant bleached fields of grasses--who can miss that we do not move through nature but that we never leave it, that we are part and parcel of it.

This ride was along the Feather river above the fish hatchery. It's a beautiful ride, yet I couldn't escape the memory of how beautiful the river was before the environment was altered by the California water project in the 1960's to dam the river (several times) in order to provide water for Southern California and flood control and recreation for Northern California. In many ways, I think Northern California got the short end of the stick. The rugged canyons and isolated gorges of the area, laced with the river branches and streams, was such a beautiful and unique environment, now buried by man-made reservoirs. What we have created has its beauty, but certainly a beauty no greater than the original.

All that talk, and then a truly grand experience like riding a bike over the suspension bridge at Lake Oroville--great moments come from within as much (or more) than from without. This ride involved climbing, an experience that I had little of or for short duration in Iowa. So, gearing down and grunting or getting off and pushing, both of these experiences I enjoyed and tucked away. The pay-off of the suspension bridge was a treat. Up in the mountains and above the water, the quality of light and sound are special. Vision expands to distances and sound echoes and deepens to silence. I feel like a stone dropped into a pond; I expand, becoming more and more as I become less and less.
I've also made two little videos from my day rides around the area. Both are just a little over a minute in length. One follows the bike trail for about two miles along the Feather River and features some of the sites. The other just is a study of light and shadow while riding some quiet roads.



This last spring I retired from teaching after 34 years. Even though I am needed now to take care of my family, I can still find time to pursue that which brings me happiness. I need to keep remembering that

Copyright 2013 by Thomas L. Kepler, all rights reserved

Wednesday, September 4, 2013

Local Bike Shop Adds Juice Bar, Spa, and Yoga Classes

"Around the country, bike shops are shifting gears. The National Bicycle Dealers Association 2013 survey of 4,000 establishments found that 12% have coffee bars, 11% offer spinning classes and almost 5% serve beer. About 1% offer massages, yoga or full-service restaurants."

This is the new trend or profile of the local bike shop, according to a recent article in the Wall Street Journal. The market researcher who profiled this new twist to bike shops predicts a five-fold increase of such diversification by 2018.

This diversification is an attempt by some bike shop owners to accomplish two things:
  1. create alternative streams of revenue
  2. attract new customers
These goals certainly have value, yet I hope that this trend toward having the local bike shop be a combination shopping site, mechanic's shop, watering hole, and health spa is a cultural change that recognizes that bicycling is our future--a green, healthy, and economical means of transportation.

So I vote a big YES for my local bike shop to add a table outside and a juice bar inside, copies of Adventure Cyclist magazine available for reading, and good company to be found.

One last cautionary word from one of these new age bike shops: "Of course, there's always a concern about keeping grease out of the refreshments."

Copyright 2013 by Thomas L. Kepler, all rights reserved

Thursday, May 23, 2013

How Bicycle Touring Is Changing--For Many, Less is More


http://bikedenton.files.wordpress.com/2009/07/img_0945.jpg
Even though I am currently away from home and my bicycles because of family business, I am at least reading and enjoying what others are doing.

I looked to buy a used bike to ride here at my hometown, a Trek that needed a lot of work--I knew at least the frame was OK--but the price was too high. I'm still without a bicycle and am reconciling myself to walking for exercise. I like walking but also like traveling further distances in a shorter time--more to see.

An article from the blog The Path Less Pedaled discusses five ways bicycle touring is changing. Here they are short and quick:
  1. shorter trips (such as overnight)
  2. multi-modal adventures (for instance, Amtrak + bike touring)
  3. family friendly touring with the kids
  4. tourism industry recognition--country roads = bicycling heaven
  5. off-road and gravel touring--"exploring new, unpaved territory"
If these ideas seem interesting, check out the original article: 5 Ways Bicycle Travel and Touring Are Changing.